Open Access Resources Available Through the Pollak Library

About Open Access

Open Access Week 2011

Open Access Week 2011

“Open Access” to information – the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need – has the power to transform the way research and scientific inquiry are conducted. It has direct and widespread implications for academia, medicine, science, industry, and for society as a whole.
— Source: Open Access Week

Our Open Access Electronic Resources

Since it’s Open Access week, we wanted to highlight a few of our electronic resources that you might find useful. The databases below are in addition to the wealth of Open Access journals like PLoS One and e-books like those offered by the National Academies Press. Find a whole list of journals in the Directory of Open Access Journals.

  • English Short Title Catalogue (British Library): Descriptions and holdings information for all types of materials published in Great Britain and its dependencies or in English anywhere in the world from the beginnings of print to 1800 — including materials ranging from Shakespeare and Greek New Testaments to anonymous ballads, broadsides, songs, advertisements, directories, almanacs, newspapers, periodicals, and other ephemera.
  • National Criminal Justice Reference Service Abstracts Database (NCJRS) (government source): Professional criminal justice database from the US Department of Justice which indexes journal articles, government reports, books, research reports, Congressional hearings, and training materials. Topics included are crime trends, crime prevention, deterrence, juvenile justice, police, courts, punishment, sentencing and more.
  • PubMed: A comprehensive index to biomedical and life sciences journals with citations to over 18 million articles back to 1948. Note: To limit to full-text articles, search PUBMED CENTRAL.
  • World Bank Open Data: This site is meant to provide all users with improved access to World Bank data and to make that data easy to find and use. The World Bank provides free and open access to a comprehensive set of data about development in countries around the globe, together with other datasets cited in the data catalog.

For Faculty and Others Who Publish

Before you publish, do you check out copyright and self-archiving policies? Make sure you’re keeping control of your own copyright! A good way to do this is through the journal’s (or publisher’s) web pages, or through RoMEO.


This post was originally authored by Jaclyn Bedoya, former Electronic Resources Librarian.

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